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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)
of inauguration's being held in the capital. that was in 1945, when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. he was the only president of united states to serve more than two terms. his third inauguration was of the capital. his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this is not the opportune time to have endean elaborate inauguration. it decided to move the inauguration today in front of the capital. could he do that? he did. the joint inaugural committee was not happy with that decision. the president of united states can decide above and beyond the date and time they're being sworn in. -- in, among other things. we move them from the east front to the west front. the crowd had been getting bigger and bigger. one reason to have them on the west front is because you could accommodate more people. if you look to the photographs of the last several inauguration's, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was the first sworn in, the crowd went back to maybe a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, the crowd ge
attempt to assassinate lincoln. and of course franklin roosevelt inaugurated in 1933 at the depths of the great depression and yet he's still able to inspire and uplift the american people to expect something new and something better. >> right, and i've heard a lot of people bantering this about. i mean, inaugurations aren't cheap. they do cost money. we do raise some private funds. lot of private funds through the inaugural committees, but we're looking at maybe $50 million at least. and some people have said, look, this is a second term. why do we need an inauguration? dot swearing in and move on. >> i think that's wrong, wrong, wrong. the price we pay as taxpayers is a small one. most of the money is raised privately. look, we don't have kings and queens in america, right? >> right. >> we don't have nobility. we have this one great tradition of the inauguration and the inaugural address, which george washington started. that's not in the constitution. it's the one time we come together and celebrate our democracy. we've now had over 200 years of stable democracy and the peaceful
tradition of inauguration's being held in the capital. that was in 1945, when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. he was the only president of united states to serve more than two terms. his third inauguration was of the capital. his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this is not the opportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. it decided to move the inauguration today in front of the capital. could he do that? he did. the joint inaugural committee was not happy with that decision. the president of united states can decide above and beyond the date and time they're being sworn in, among other things. we move them from the east front to the west front. the crowd had been getting bigger and bigger. one reason to have them on the west front is because you could accommodate more people. if you look to the photographs of the last several inauguration's, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was the first sworn in, the crowd went back to maybe a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, the crowd gets fu
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
they couldn't actually be here. >> they would have heard something different before franklin roosevelt. franklin roosevelt was the first president to initiate the repetition of each line of the oath after the chief justice gives it. before that, they went through the entire oath and the president would say i do. >> very interesting. i did not know that. >> we also saw that president obama will put his hand on the lincoln bible, also a bible used by dr. king. what's the history of that? >> well, all but three presidents have put their hands. the three are john quincy adams who put his hand on a book of laws. and calvin coolage and franklin. it was accustom not to put your hand on a bible. so only three. >> what i didn't know and i don't think i knew nor did i see happening where the hand is. that is all very thought out too. >> right. everything is a message during the inauguration. beyond the speech. for example, the first inaugural parade to have african american was abraham lincoln in 1865. the first to have women marching was woodrow wilson. the people are thinking through the symbo
's a ritual. there's a lot of celebrities in the crowd. i learned he join us franklin roosevelt as the only president to take the oath four times. he did it over two terms though. >> do you want to explain that? >> well he did it twice the first time because of roberts and then he did it twice this time because of sunday. >> yesterday, roberts read from a piece of paper when he administered the formal oath. >> it's experience. you learn from experience. today it will be how obama tackles the speech. in the past it has been a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to br
tradition of the inauguration speech held at the capitol. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision. the president of the united states can decide above and beyond the date and the time everything else is tradition and can be changed. we reverted back to holding inaugurations at the capitol. we moved them from the east front to the west front and the crowd has been getting bigger and bigger. one reason on the west front is that you can accommodate more people. if you look at the photographs of the last several inaugurations, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was sworn in, the crowds went back to a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, at the crowd gets a little bit further
of the president, the precedent that teddy roosevelt established. it's franklin roosevelt and the experience during world war ii that really changes the nature of the office and it's the cold war. the greatest expansion in presidential power throughout our history has taken place during times of war. what happens during the cold war is war is institutionalized. we live in a time of permanent war. it's the president's role as commander in chief that leads to not only the creation of this great apparatus around the executive, but also the expansion of power. this is the one elected person in our constitutional system and during a time of the threat of nuclear war, it's one person who can make decisions. if you're looking at the key turning points, it begins with teddy roosevelt, wilson, franklin roosevelt and then the cold war forges what is now the modern presidency. >> steve, thank you very much. good luck with the special. >> thank you. >>> up next, krystal goes invisible like manti te'o's girlfriend and goes behind enemy lines to give tips or republican as they vf have a strategy session. it was
franklin roosevelt started it in 1933. president obama arrived at the capitol just a few minutes ago. he will soon be announced to the crowd and seated. here are the highlights of today's program. vice president joe biden will take the oath of office first administered by supreme court associate justice sonia sotomayor. >> and then the crowd will be treated to a musical selection by james taylor and then chief justice john roberts will administer the presidential oath of office to mr. obama. that comes just before noon eastern time. now, following the president's inaugural address will be another musical selection. this one by kelly clarkson, and a poem by richard blanco. reverend luis leon will give the benediction followed by beyonce. she's going to sing the national anthem, she had a baby, and she's going to perform at the super bowl. >> not to be upstaged, hampsto pearson is at the capitol. what are you seeing? >> beyonce got a much bigger cheer than i did. it was one of the more electric moments that just happened a few minutes ago when she and jay-z came in. you just missed the int
suddenly finds he has less power than he thought he had. franklin park zoo in -- franklin roosevelt in 1937, more democratic congress than in any time of the century suddenly realize that the supreme court can keep on overruling the things he gets passed through congress so he tries to pack the supreme court, slapped down, bad second term. in nixon's case-- and i think bob woodward can speak on this, too-- at the beginning of his time he had both houses of congress in democratic hands. he was turning to something called impoundment saying i'm just not going to spend the money for these bills, these acts, these agencies that democrats are voting for in the house and senate and even in the absence of watergate it's possible that that could have gone to impeachment. >> rose: jon meacham in nashville, thomas jonathan van everyson after a successful first term in which the louisiana purchase was dominant he goes into the second term and what happens? >> well his second inaugural address is largely an attack on the press so he set a tone there. every subsequent president has wanted to do that, ma
of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that's the message on this martin luther king day. and he said when times change, so must we. so i think all of those things are right. and he said, you know, it's not what binds this nation together is not the color
of a president to name something, i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress and was from day one in this country the president at the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these terms which are sort of created by presidents we think are, um, they are from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term "first lady." he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was "keep the ball rolling." i'm jumping around a little bit, but it's sort of fun. woodrow wilson had potomac fever which was something harry truman love offed to quote. -- loved to quote. watchful waiting was very closely associated with woodrow waiting first in his relationship to the dictatorship in mexico where
wants. franklin roosevelt in 1937 got in the biggest landslide in presidential history. the congress was more democratic than it had been in that century, has ever been since then, yet he saw the supreme court overruling program after program of his so he decided to come back and ask congress to be able to pack the courts with justices of his own choosing. they slapped it down, had a lot to do with that being a miserable term nap's what barack obama was talking about when he said overreach. >> james, i'm curious about potential powder kegs here. without thinking about things like natural disasters that could come along, what are things that you see as potentially plaguing this second term? does the arab spring and some negative fallout from that terrorism, anything else just -- >> bypass the natural disaster piece so quickly because i think that climb change is something that is not as random as we think it is. so this administration, because i think it owes it to the folk who put them in place, has to be knowledgeable about how our environment is going to unfold in the next several
are attending an inauguration morning service, a tradition started by franklin roosevelt. i'm matt lauer along with savannah guthrie, natalie morales and al roker. >>> we got our first look at the obamas and bidens this morning. after church, the president will head back to the white house, and have a 10:00 coffee with congressional leaders of both parties. and then at 11:55 am the president will take the oath of office, immediately followed by his second inaugural address. >>> after lunch inside the capital, the parade makes its way to the white house, with inaugural floats honoring, among others, the president's birth place, hawaii, and the state of illinois. >>> we saw her in her thom browne coat, starting off her husband's second term, though, with a new look. you noticed the bangs. they have been the talk of town the past few days. we'll take a look at her influence over fashion over the past four years. >> i think there's going to be a lot of talk this morning about the size of the crowd here today and comparing it to the size of the crowd that was here back in 2009, something like 1.8 m
hoover, franklin roosevelt, which was signed by his wife, eleanor roosevelt, harry truman, and dwight eisenhower, lyndon johnson, john kennedy, richard nixon, gerald ford, jimmy carter, ronald reagan, george bush, and so on. more recently, george w. bush and barack obama. the tradition has been maintained. when a new president is elected, st. john's makes an effort to contact them and have them sign this historic book, which is a very dear item to the church. it is one of those great pieces of history that has been long associated with this church, from 1856 till the present one of the little-known fact about presidential inaugurations is that it has been the custom in modern times to have a church service, and worship service of some kind before the president takes the oath of office. people feel this is a longstanding tradition. it began with franklin roosevelt on march 4, 1933. when he wished to have a worship service take place before he took the oath of office, in the depths of the great depression. he contacted the church and he organized a special service with his former headma
that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean the future. >> one example of this in history is that lincoln at the beginning of his presidency idolized george washington, thought a lot about him, but as the problems got more difficult, as he became in certain ways more radical he was much more interested in people like thomas jefferson. there is that evolution. >> so is there a concern that this president expressed when you had that intimate dinner about looking at history and where other presidents went wrong? >> i think most presidents know that in this off the record dinner. we won't go into a sort of a transcript, but i think you can see very much in terms of what he says in public and what he does that this is someone who, for instance, if you talk about lyndon johnson and the war in vietnam he not only know what is people are talking about but t
country, or franklin roosevelt, we have nothing to fear but fear itself. or abraham lincoln, with malice towards none in the civil war. it's almost as much the moment, the point we are in history and a president who rises to that moment, unites americans, touches the common spirit, as it is the skill of all my friends who are speech writers coming up with those memorable words. >> arthel: if it's that idea of touching our collective soul and make the best of the moment, as you would say is the best use of an inaugural speech, what do you think the american people want to hear in president obama's second inaugural speech on monday? >> you know, if you think back four years ago, the country was full of hope. it was a real celebration. it was an historic moment. we were maturitying our first african-american president. there was a sense that they were on the verge of a great time of hope. things are definitely different now. we've got a divided country. it's a less historic moment. we got a lot of folks still looking for jobs and can't find them. we've got partisan politics and a paralyzed
. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i h
clinton fatigue and bush fatigue and reagan fatigue. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. [video clip] >> i have one major regret. i took a risk with our action in regards to ira
wallace, franklin delano roosevelt post of vice president and agriculture commerce secretary. it suggests that america would have been on a very different trajectory had his pass not been blocked in 1944. >> seeing the war clouds gathering on the horizon, roosevelt decided to run for a third term against the strongly anti-war candidate wendell willkie. the stakes were high. the nation would soon be a war. roosevelt weigh the options and chose a controversial secretary of agriculture, henry wallace, as his running mate. wallace had successfully overseen rebuilding after the depression. he had provided food stamps and school lunches. he instituted programs for land use planning and soil conservation. he carved out his credentials in the new year deals as an outspoken anti-fascist. he was considered the scientific community's best ally. he spoke out strongly against the building of a of racial theories in rebuke of the hitler polity -- policy. >> he first introduced me to the mysteries of plant fertilization. i spent a good many years breeding corn because the scientist deepened my appreciat
times since what president? >> franklin roosevelt. >> all right. wins the prize? >> let me give you this. how about this? he is the first president, first democratic president since franklin roosevelt to be elected with more than 50% twice. he is also the first president since dwight eisenhower to be elected twice with more than 51%. >> there you go? >> ranken was above. a mandate. >> a second term. will we see any difference in his second term? what's the second term going to look like? i know you are talking about that with some folks in columbia? >> i will be up at the university of district of columbia with a great event organized by progressive democrats of america, national nurses united, communication workers, a lot of unions bringing together all sorts of folks. keith ellison will be there as well as a lot of other folks talking about this. i think obama can be different. the question is: will he? >> he was showing good signs? >> the transition has been one of the better trigs in modern history. he took on the whole fiscal cliff thing and was strong
. >> reporter: franklin delano roosevelt lifted people's spirits too. he used the first of his four inaugural addresses to start the healing of a nation badly broken from the great depression. >> the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> reporter: more than a generation later when nearly 2 million people crowded onto the national mall to see the swearing in of the first african-american president, it was a moment of national unity. but as this historian notes when the president gives his second inaugural address, the magic for the most part is lost. >> they are not as impressive not as compelling as first inaugural spices. >> don baer who was a speech righter for clinton says the most recent speeches whether by eisenhower, fdr, reagan clinton, or george w. bush don't soar to the same heights as they're measured against the reality of the first four years. >> well the first inaugural is sort of like a new baby right? there's so much expectation and potential. the second is like an adolescent, a teenager. we know it didn't quite turn out exactly the way we hoped.
for the fourth time since franklin roosevelt. >> jennifer: amazing. >> john: very true. that's a piece of trivia that won't be matched any time soon. >> jennifer: while we're watching the inaugustral procession, the first president to actually ride in a bulletproof car was lyndon johnson in 1965, michael shure. the first president to ride in a car at all, excuse me, david shuster, are you there? the first president to ride in a ceremony in a car was warren harding back in 1921. so shuster, can you see from where you are. you've got a unique spot looking back at the capitol. can you see any of that happening? >> yeah, we can see over to constitution avenue. can see the crowds blocked off. we can see the monitor. what i wanted to say about the motorcade is a couple of things. first of all, in order to prepare pennsylvania avenue for this path, they removed something like 25 different stoplights that were on poles and the other thing that they do as part of security is early this morning, the electric company and gas company will go manhole cover by manhole cover, prop them open, make sure nothing
about a president who used all kinds of executive authority. look at teddy roosevelt or franklin roosevelt. that's what presidents do. you know what that's called? it's called leadership. we want people who will lead in times of crisis. not who are afraid of their own shadows. phillip down in gainesville florida. >> caller: hi, i wanted to say i completely totally agree about what you were saying about gun control hasn't gone far enough and that you know, i think we should go in the direction of britain and australia. >> bill: i agree. >> caller: i also think the time is a little too late, you know. when obama first ran for president on hope and change, i was ecstatic to get obama in there and i was just like all of these changes are going to happen. and i was so completely disappointed when we had a democratic president and a democratic majority in the house and nancy pelosi as speaker of the house and the time to have done something on gun control would have been then. but the first words that really made me think that something's wrong here is when nancy pelosi got up and spea
on their heels. overreach is a common risk of presidents in their second term. classic example is franklin roosevelt wins the election, tries to change the supreme court. it all comes tumbling down. the president has to be conscious of that. divide republicans between those who believe the party has to try to rebuild itself, rebuild the national majority and those that are locked into a staunchly conservative view? >> even with the supreme court's decision, would you expect that it will still play a large role in the second term? >> it's absolutely critical for him to be able to make this work. his re-election means republicans in congress will not be able to repeal it. >> and next year is when we really start to feel the impact. >> absolutely. he is still in hand-to-hand combat with governors in particular in implementing it. a number of republican governors have refused to set up what's required, and the public component of expansion of coverage. there's lots of challenges of moving 30 million more people into an insurance-based system. so that could mean enormous implementation challeng
little facts about our inaugural weather. wettest inaugural, franklin d. roosevelt. 1.77 inches of rain picked up during the inaugural swearing-in. almost .7. then the snowiest inaugural, william taft, 9.8 inches of heavy snow, drifting snow, strong winds. almost blizzard-like conditions. clouding up later. 30% chance of afternoon snowshowers. temperatures in the mid 30s to the low 40s. by the afternoon, we're looking for a high of 47 degrees. that's what's going on around the country. here's what's happening in your neck of the woods. >> good morning. right on the mall, temperatures are a little above freezing now. generally in the mid 30s. elsewhere, still below freezing in many locations in the rural areas. it's in the upper 20s to near 30. we have clouds coming through. a mostly cloudy day with highs reaching the mid and upper 40s in washington. elsewhere, highs in the upper 30s and low 40s. windy and cold tonight. maybe some passing snowshowers late afternoon into the evening that could leave a dusting. windy and cold weather tomorrow >> and that's your latest weather. savannah? >>
crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. douglas brinkley, historian. >> that was a very unique year and most normal situations even if we're in recession or in a foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say i know that i was, you know, a part of american history and that really means a lot to me. >> a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylin
: only two presidents have been sworn in on two separate occasions, franklin d. roosevelt and barack obama because of what happened in 2009. swearing in at noon eastern time today for the president, tomorrow is the public ceremony. vice-president joe biden will be sworn in within the next 10 minutes to 15 minutes from his residence. the flag in the center of your screen is the same one used in his ceremonial office. you can see two paintings. one is lincoln delivering his second inaugural address. one of the more memorable second inaugural addresses in history. guest: that is exactly right. the end of the civil war, leaving it the country at a press of this for which direction they could go. in his words, now the story is none, it set the groundwork for what he envisioned. historians have argued about how it was carried out and what may have been one of the world's greatest what ifs, if he had not been assassinated a few days later. let just a couple of miles to the white house, where the vice president and his official residence is located. the first vice-president of the president
bottle. >>> inform 1933 franklin delano roosevelt was sworn in as president for the first of his four terms and with these words he delivered an inaugural address that's been called the most important american speech of the 20th century. >> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> of that voice rings true. anyway, f dsmth r's first inall ral has the last to be healed in march. the 20th amendment ratified in the january of '33 moved all subsequent inaugurals to january so it would be colder and we'll be right back. [ nyquil bottle ] you know i relieve coughs, sneezing, fevers... [ tylenol bottle ] me too! and nasal congestion. [ tissue box ] he said nasal congestion. yeah...i heard him. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price.
announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> in 1933 franklin delano roosevelt was sworn in as president for the first of his four terms, and with these words he delivered an inaugural address that's been called the most important american speech of the 20th century. >> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> that voice rings true. anyway, fdr's first inaugural was the last to be held in march. the 20th amendment ratified in january of '33 moved all subsequent inaugurals to january so it would be colder, and we'll be right back. she keeps you guessing. it's part of what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and
franklin d. roosevelt to take the oath of office four times. in 2009, he took the oath twice because, in a do-over, performed the day after chief justice john roberts tripped on his lines during the first inauguration. >> within a few days, the president will be walking from that part of the capitol right here, and then down these stairs. >> suarez: new york democratic senator chuck schumer is chairman of the joint congressional committee on inaugural ceremonies, which oversees all of the inaugural rituals related to the capitol. >> there's no tanks in the streets, there's no rioting or picketing or protesting. it's a beautiful thing about america that the inauguration reminds us of. with all the trouble we have, the inauguration symbolizes that the republic marches onward. >> suarez: the president's inauguration will begin, as it did four years ago, with a national day of service tomorrow where people will be encouraged to pledge a year's effort to community organizations. at the inauguration itself, there are a few firsts. >> 150 years after the emancipation proclamation was signed
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)

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